Hot Off The Press: Why Eloqua Hired A Journalist

by Eloqua on November 8, 2010 in Content Marketing

Journalism is in my blood. I started my career at a tabloid daily where the smell of hot ink permeated the air, reporters rolled up their sleeves, and a symphony of ringing phones carried on day and night.
 
So you might be wondering: What am I doing at Eloqua?
 
Well, when I first began covering business at the Boston Herald it was during a time of seismic upheaval. As a cub reporter charged with covering media, marketing and new technologies, it was clear the traditional press wasn’t just competing with bloggers and citizen journalists. The very businesses we were tasked with following wanted in on the game, too.
 
The flight to the Internet gave companies the opportunity to generate buzz, get in front of the news and connect directly with their desired audience. But the truly innovative businesses go a step further and produce content that informs, educates and entertains an entire market.
 
Enter Eloqua. Our goal here is to create content that will challenge long-held assumptions, introduce thought leaders and impact pivotal decisions. That led the company to take the unprecedented step of bringing a journalist in-house.
 
The Corporate Reporter role is a new one. My task is to drill down within the company and the industry to find the stories that too often go untold. I will profile brands and the people that work for them. And I will attempt to explain game-changing trends as they happen.
 
It’s a departure of sorts from the journalism I have done in the past. But one thing that hasn’t changed is how much I depend on sources to supply me with the leads and topics that eventually turn into compelling narratives.
 
Here’s your chance to weigh in. What are the ideas and issues that will alter the industry today, next month or even a year from now? Which technologies are disrupting your market? Is there one story you’ve been itching to read about in the press? As I attempt to deliver fresh perspectives and concepts, please consider this the place to sound off.
 
Let the conversation begin…

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  • http://www.webinknow.com/ David Meerman Scott

    Welcome Jesse – you joined a great company. Have fun.

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  • http://www.bullhorn.com Meg Gerritson (Tuni)

    Brilliant move bringing in a journalist, Eloqua and congratulations on your new role, Jesse.

  • http://blog.eloqua.com/ Jesse Noyes

    Thanks, David. I’m really happy to be here. I’m sure I’ll be talking with you soon.

  • http://www.eloqua.com Jesse Noyes

    Thanks, Meg. We’re going to do some great (and innovative) stuff here.

  • http://www.eloqua.com Brian Kardon

    David Meerman Scott really helped us to see the wisdom of this move! A big thank you to David … and welcome to Jesse!

  • Ryan Ruud

    Great post Jesse. Are you on Twitter? I left a career in Journalism for a similar position in a tech company.

  • http://www.eloqua.com Jesse Noyes

    Hi Ryan,
    Always good to know another scribe. We plan to do real journalism on here so keep coming back and please let me know where to keep track of your content. I am on Twitter: @noyesjesse.
    Jesse

  • http://www.eloqua.com Jesse Noyes

    Brian,
    Thanks for the warm welcome. I’m excited about what we’re going to do here.
    Jesse

  • http://marketingiteration.com jascha kaykas-wolff

    you joined a great team. congrats Jesse.

    • http://www.eloqua.com Jesse Noyes

      Thank you, Jascha. I’m privileged to be a part of it. Don’t hesitate to check back here and let us know what you like and don’t like.

      Jesse

  • http://www.knowpreneur.net Tony Wanless

    Way to go Jesse:

    As a business journalist, I could see the writing on the wall as well. So I left several years ago and now have my own content marketing company.
    The format and style may differ, but it’s not really all that revolutionary in terms of the work you do. I continually tell worried journalists that if they can adapt to change in media, there is plenty of work out there for them.

    Good Luck
    Tony Wanless

    • http://www.eloqua.com Jesse Noyes

      Hear, Hear, Tony!

      The location and environment may be different, but conceptually we’re still producing content aimed at informing an audience. I imagine more companies will do the same in the very near future. Bravo to you for being ahead of curve.

      Jesse

  • http://www.theBoneyard.com/ Dan Hall

    Read the writing on the Wall!

    At least while we still have walls. As a seasonal business owner I have seen a fundamental shift over the last few years. For me it’s not so much being ahead of or behind the curve as it is to react to the curve. We learn from those that do! And you are doing it.

    • http://www.eloqua.com Jesse Noyes

      Dan,

      Thanks for the kind words. I appreciate them. You are correct. Perhaps “ahead of the curve” has no real intrinsic meaning these days. It’s all about reacting to the bends in the road. My cheers go to Eloqua for having the daring to make this move. It took a whole team of smart folks to put this position together.

      Please keep checking back with us and sharing your insights.

      Jesse

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